Premier Clocks

The clocks in this section give a view into our high quality inventory.
We have many others in stock and in restoration that are not illustrated here by makers such as;
Daniel Quare, Henricus Jones, Edward Stanton, George Etherington, Charles Gretton, Robert Dingley, Jospeh Windmills and various others.
If you are looking for something special please contact us, we may be able to help.
Daniel Clavier Paris.
 
 An exceptionally fine and rare French Louis X1V religieuse clock by Daniel Clavier Paris. The case from the workshops of Andre Charles Boulle C1680.               The fine case attributed to the workshops of Andre Charles Boulle is in counter partie marquetry with a brass background and inlaid with red shell and pewter. There are ebony mouldings brass feet and 3 exquisite 2 part flambé and swag finials. The sides have arched windows and are laid into shell panels with ebony surrounds.              The most beautifully made movement of 25 days duration strikes the hours and ½ hours on a bell, it has five turned vase shaped back pinned pillars, large spring barrels, finely decorated metalwork, silk suspension, verge escapement with outside cycloidal cheeks and an outside countwheel. The backplate is fully signed.               The velvet covered dial has a 7 ¾” applied chapter ring with numbered outside minutes, engraved brass hands, and an ormolu ornament fully signed on a brass plaque.
 
               Daniel Clavier is recorded working in Paris from 1679 – 1685. He worked in the La Cite area along with some of the finest makers including Pierre Du Chesne, Samuel Panier, Joseph Baronneau etc. working in the area allowed them to come into contact with the finest casemakers and bronzists of the period. His short working life is reflected in the rarity of his clocks. One is illustrated on pf 72 of “Early French Pendulum Clocks by Reinier Plomp”.
 
William Robson London C1790.
A Most magnificent 6 tune ebony and gilt musical clock by William Robson London C1790.   
       The ebony case has an arched top surmounted by a caddy with 4 sound frets and a large finial. The arched glazed front door is glazed and has a gilt brass border. There are front and back caryatid columns, elaborate sound frets, carrying handles, a bottom moulding with floral and fruit border and elaborate cast scrolling feet.          A most attractive case with the liberal use of gilt brass.          The 8” x 12” brss dial has unusual scrolling and flower spandrels, a painted chapter and centre dial, two similar subsidiary dials and signature plaque. One subsidiary is for the tune selection and the other for the date. There is also a strike-silent facility, Plus 2 repeat cords one for the hour and the other for the music.          The substantial 6-pillar, 8-day verge escapement movement strikes the hours on a bell and plays a tune every hour on 13 bells. The backplate is beautifully engraved with flowers and foliage.
 
  
         William Robson a famous musical clock maker was apprenticed in 1771 to Thomas Harpur for 7 years. He became a member of the clockmakers company in 1787 and rose to the highest office in the company becoming master in 1809. He was recorded working in Bridgewater Square and then red Cross St.             As well as making his own clocks he had quite a business making high quality movements for other top makers. He died in 1823.
 
 
John Arnold, London C1795.
 
 A very fine 3 pad mahogany precision bracket clock by John Arnold, London C1795.          The domed top has 3 pads with brass banding, side carrying handles, fish scale frets and brass feet. Everything about this case is of the highest quality.         The 8” arched silvered dial has a regulation ring, a strike-silent, original hands and is signed below 12. The movement is of exceptional quality with 5 turned pillars dead beat escapement jewelled pallets and a 4 ½” pendulum bob. Hour striking on a bell is via a rack. Of particular note is the beautiful way the regulation mechanism has been made.   John Arnold born Bodmin ( Cornwall) C1736 apprenticed to his father John in 1755 he went to Holland working as a watchmaker returning in 1757. He worked around the country until settling in Devereux court in the Strand, London where he became very famous for his chronometers, watches and precision clocks and had royal patronage. He retired in 1796 and died in 1799 for a full history see Vaudrey Mercers book John Arnold and son.
 It would seem that John Arnold’s clocks were signed just Arnold between 1793 and 1796. His son spent only one year with Breguet and returned during the revolution in 1793. At this point he was still apprenticed to his father. When he became free in 1796 they traded as John Arnold and Son. So this clock can be safely dated at 1795 and as being John Arnold.
SOLD
View DetailsView Details
SOLD
 
Joseph Windmills, London C.1695
A fine mulberry wood month going longcase clock by Joseph Windmills C.1695          The hood has a caddy top surmounted by 3 brass finials, a sound fret, brass capped turned pillars and long side windows. The long trunk door has a glass lenticle and the base and sides are laid into panels. It sits on bun feet.          The beautifully made month duration movement has 6 turned pillars (the centre one latched) anchor escapement, and strikes the hours on a bell via an outside countwheel.          The 12” dial has winged cherub corner spandrels with engraving between, ringed winding holes, date aperture with engraved surround, original hands and is signed on the chapter ring.A fine clock of good colour. Similar cases can be seen in the Windmills book pg 56 & 58.
        Joseph Windmills was a member of the clockmakers company from 1671 – 1723. He was master in 1702/3 one of the finest makers of the period. A full history can be seen in “Joseph & Thomas Windmills” by J.A Neale.
SOLD
View DetailsView Details
SOLD
 
Pierre Le Maire, Paris C1675
A fine early French pendule religeuse by Pierre Le Maire, Paris C1675.
     The case is veneered in tortoiseshell and ebony with the front door and arched top being inlaid with engraved brass scrolling foliage. There are three torch and drapery finials.     The most beautifully made 8-day movement strikes the hours and ½ hours on a bell. It has 5 turned vase shaped back pinned pillars, separate going and striking barrels, finely decorated metal work, silk suspended verge escapement with cycloid cheeks, a numbered outside countwheel and a fully signed backplate.     The black velvet covered dial has an 8” applied gilt brass chapter ring with outside minutes, pierced and engraved gilt brass hands and is signed on a central gilt brass shield flanked by putty trumpeters.
The case of this clock may be attributed to the workshops of Andre Charles Boulle, who was working in the Louvre nearby and is known to have made large numbers of cases for all the prominent makers of the last quarter of the 17th century.Literature: Vehmeyer collection volume II page 800-7. D.R.Plomp. Early French pendulum clocks 1658-1700 pg69.Pierre Le Maire, the son of Henri was working in St Germain Paris in 1675 along with his son Jean. Working there would have allowed them to come into contact with the finest case makers and bronzists of the period and they produced some exceptional clocks.         
They were Protestants and he and his son were imprisoned in St Germain Abbey and their material sold in 1687. He is thought to have gone to Amsterdam with his son around that time.
 
Andrew Brown, Edinburgh C1695.
A most rare, month going ebony and rosewood longcase clock by Andrew Brown, Edinburgh C1695.              The hood has a caddy top with 3 giltwood finials, a fine repousse brass fret, long side windows and ebony side columns with turned giltwood capitals.              The long trunk door has a ½ round ebony beaded edge, crossbanding, brass bound lenticel and boxwood lined geometrical decoration – a feature that continues on the base, which sits on bun feet.              There is ebony mouldings throughout the case, all the sides are laid into panels with crossbanding and boxwood lines. The carcass of this case is of heavy pine construction suitable to take the heavy month going weights.              The month going movement has 5 wheel trains, anchor escapement and strikes the hours on a bell via a countwheel. It has long plates and 5 finely turned pillars. The 12” dial has the early use of crown and cherub spandrels, ringed winding holes, calendar aperture, seconds ring, original hands and a bold signature on the chapter ring.Andrew Brown, son of James brown of Langnewton was apprenticed to Humphrey Mills on the 21st Dec 1664. On the 30th June 1675 he was made a Burgess of Edinburgh and a week later a freeman of the hammermen. In 1677 he married Catherine Hogg and had at least 3 sons. In 1689 and 1690 he was elected boxmaster of the hammermen second in command to the Deacon, while in 1696 he became guild brother of Edinburgh. He died 12/4/1712.                John Smith, author of Old Scottish Clockmakers quotes “in view of the long time he was in business, 35 years, it is remarkable how exceedingly scarce are specimens of his art, only 3 have come under our notice one being the splendid clock in the lobby of the advocates library, another that was exposed in the window of a dealer in queen St. and the third in the possession of a private party.                Our clock case was made by the same cabinet maker that made the clock case in the advocate’s library. Similarities include a heavy pine carcase, brass repousse fret, identical capitals on the hood pillars, and the most unusual practice of inlaying boxwood of geometric patterns into rosewood veneers, although the advocates clock does have marquetry to the trunk door and caddy top, it does have boxwood strung panels to the sides and a very similar base to our clock.Conclusions:               Any clock dated pre.1700 from Edinburgh is an extremely rare item. Our discovery of this clock virtually intact and its subsequent restoration to a fine working clock is indeed a rare occurrence. 


For further extensive info on Andrew Brown please see Clocks Magazine January 2013.
 
Samuel Gascoigne, London C1685.
 
 A fine early 10” dial walnut longcase clock by Samuel Gascoigne, London C1685.
 The flat topped hood has a fret, long side windows, barley twist columns with turned wood capitals and a convex throat moulding beneath.          The 42” long trunk door has an applied ½ round edging mould and the base sits on bun feet. There is a chevron border to the door and base and the sides are set into panels.          The excellent 8-day movement has 4 finely turned and latched pillars, anchor escapement, good wheelwork and strikes the hours on a bell via an inside countwheel.          The 10” dial has winged cherub head corner spandrels, fine hands, ringed winding holes, a date aperture, and is signed below VI – Samuel Gascoigne, London.
 
Samuel Gascoigne was born in 1655 and was apprenticed in March 1669 to Arthur Dove after whose death was transferred to Robert Seignior until 1676. He was free of the clockmakers company in April 1676 and took on as apprentices Richard Gascoigne, his brother in July 1676, Henry Osmonde in July 1681 and Matthew Nightingale in April 1686.
 He died in 1698. He was known for watches and longcase clocks.
 
Claudius Du Chesne, London C1700.
 
 A very fine walnut longcase clock by Claudius Du Chesne, London C1700.             The hood has a stepped caddy top surmounted by 3 giltwood urn and flambé finials. There are 2 frets, turned wood columns with gilt brass caps and long side windows.               The long trunk door has a half round beaded edge and a chevron border, the similar base has a double plinth and the sides are laid into panels.               This clock displays the height of elegance of the period and is similar in design and quality to the best clocks of Tompion and Quare.               The 12” dial has a chevron border, female mask spandrels, date aperture, seconds dial and an alarm disc. The original hands are quite exquisite.               The 8-day movement has 5 finely turned pillars anchor escapement and strikes the hours on a bell via a rack. The alarm mechanism is wound by a separate rope.               This movement is of the highest quality by one of the best makers from the golden age of horology.
 
 
                Claudius Du Chesne was from Paris and moved to London in 1690. He was a free brother of the clockmakers company in London in Sept 1693. A maker of fine clocks many of a complex nature. He was working in Longacre and Dean St Soho.
 
Thomas Best, London C1780.
 
 A fine attractive 6-tune mahogany musical clock by Thomas Best, London C1780.           The case has a domed top surmounted by a pagoda and 5 finials. There are brass side handles and elaborate frets to the sides, front caryatid columns, door surround and scrolling feet.          The 7” dial has floral decoration to the bottom corners and the arched top. The chapter dial has original hands and a full signature and the tune selection is in the arch.          The 8-day, 6-pillar movement has substantial shaped plates, verge escapement, plays the tunes on 10 bells and strikes the hours on one. The backplate is beautifully engraved with flowers and foliage.   
             Thomas Best was working at 3 Red Lion St, Clerkenwell, London from 1770 – 1794. He was renowned for his musical clocks both for the home market and export. He also made a large number of watches for the Dutch market.
 
William Dutton, London
 
A fine and rare mahogany longcase clock by William Dutton, London with grand sonnerie striking C1775.
 
           The well figured case ( with solid mahogany carcass) of good colour with concave sided cresting surmounted by a brass ball finial above an arched top, fluted canted corners to the hood and long side windows.            The trunk has an arched door and panelled plinth with block feet.            The 12” dial with double screwed foliate and C scroll spandrels, signed William Dutton, London, with arch calendar dial, seconds dial, original hands, and strike-silent above 12. The massive 6 pillar movement has dead beat escapement, maintaining power, regulator back cock with roller suspension, and metal rod pendulum with large brass lenticular bob with calibrated regulation nut. Grand sonnerie striking the ¼`s on 2 bells and the hours on one.  
 
          William Dutton was born in 1720 in Marston( Bucks) he was apprenticed to George Graham of London in 1738 and became a member of the clockmakers company from 1746. In 1755 he became a partner with Thomas Mudge, this partnership ended in 1771 when Mudge moved to Plymouth. William continued making the highest quality clocks with his son Matthew.
 One of England’s finest clockmakers.
 
Andrew Broun (sic) Edinburgh C1695.
          The hood has a caddy top with 3 giltwood finials, a fine repouse brass fret, long side windows and ebony columns with giltwood capitals.           The long trunk door has a ½ round ebony beaded edge, brass bound lenticle and boxwood lined marquetry panels. The base has a central marquetry panel and sits on four bun feet.           The carcass of this case is of pine with ebony mouldings. All the marquetry is set into ebony panels and all the veneers and some mouldings on the front of the case are rosewood. The sides are veneered in elm.           The minimal restoration of this case included removal of a small base apron, replacement of the bun feet into their original holes and the removal and replacement of a thin strip of later marquetry around the hood door.                           Any clock dated pre.1700 from Edinburgh is an extremely rare item. Our inventory of two examples plus the advocate’s library clock (all made by the same cabinet maker) and the two recorded by John Smith now brings the total of pre 1700 clocks by Andrew Brown to 5.           The month going movement has 5 wheel trains, anchor escapement and strikes the hours on a bell via an outside countwheel. It has oblong plates and 5 finely turned pillars. The 12” dial has the early use of crown and cherub spandrels, ringed winding holes, calendar aperture, seconds ring, original hands and full signature on the chapter ring. 
                Andrew Brown, son of James brown of Langnewton was apprenticed to Humphrey Mills on the 21st Dec 1664. On the 30th June 1675 he was made a Burgess of Edinburgh and a week later a freeman of the hammermen. In 1677 he married Catherine Hogg and had at least 3 sons. In 1689 and 1690 he was elected boxmaster of the hammermen second in command to the Deacon, while in 1696 he became guild brother of Edinburgh. He died 12/4/1712.             John Smith, author of Old Scottish Clockmakers quotes “in view of the long time he was in business, 35 years, it is remarkable how exceedingly scarce are specimens of his art, only 3 have come under our notice one being the splendid clock in the lobby of the advocates library, another that was exposed in the window of a dealer in queen St. and the third in the possession of a private party. For further extensive info on Andrew Brown please see Clocks Magazine January 2013.
 
John Clowes, London C1690.
Ref 569A fine 17th century ebony bracket clock by John Clowes, London C1690.
         The ebony case has brass bun feet, carrying handle, front and side frets with silk backing. The substantial twin fusee 8-day hour striking movement has 5 beautifully turned pillars, verge escapement, and pull quarter repeat on 3 bells. The backplate is exquisitely engraved with flowers and foliage, a wheatear border, and a signed backcock. The 7" square dial has cherub head corner spandrels, date aperture, mock pendulum, ringed winding holes and a strike silent lever. There is fine engraving to the dial centre and the chapter ring is signed John Clowes, London.
John Clowes born in 1651, free of the clockmakers company in 1672. Both he and his brother James were renowned for the quality of their clocks. John is recorded as making “a rich pendulum weekly clock” for the king.
 
Robert Williamson, London C.1685.
Ref No 532A very fine and small ebony bracket clock by Robert Williamson, London C.1685.
The ebony vennered case has brass escutcheons, bun feet, carrying handle and brass dome mounts which cover silk covered sound apertures.       The well made twin fuse 8-day hour striking movement has 5 beautifully turned pillars, verge escapement, pull quarter repeat on 2 bells and a strike-silent lever. The backplate is exquisitely engraved with flowers and foliage and is fully signed in a cartouche. The 7" square dial has cherub corner spandrels, original hands, central engraved Tudor rose and a date aperture surrounded by engraving.
            Robert Williamson, a fine maker was apprenticed in 1658 to John harris. He was free of the clockmakers company in 1666 and was working in St. Bartholemews Lane near Royal Exchange. He was assistant in the Clockmakers Company from 1682, warden from 1685 and master in 1698. He died around 1704.
 
Robert Dingley, London C1690.
 
         
 
 
 
A fine walnut marquetry clock by Robert Dingley, London C1690.
 
 The flat topped hood has a fret, long side windows, barley twist columns and flower and foliage marquetry around the door. A long trunk door has applied ½ round edging, a glass lenticle and is divided up into 3 marquetry panels. There is a square panel of marquetry in the base which sits on bun feet. The sides are set into panels.
Note: The attractive marquetry retains some of its original colour.
           The excellent 8-day movement has 5 finely turned pillars, good wheelwork and strikes the hours on a bell via an inside countwheel. The 11in dial has winged cherub head spandrels, fine hands, ringed winding holes, date aperture with engraved decoration and is signed on the chapter ring. “Robert Dingley, London”.Robert Dingley was born in 1647. The son of Thomas of Ewell Surrey. He was apprenticed in 1661 to Richard Pierce and was freed in 1668. He was a renowned early maker of longcase clocks and watches and died in 1698.
 
Clerke 1 Royal Exchange, London No5050 C1870.
A fine quality longcase regulator signed Clerke 1 Royal Exchange, London No5050 C1870.
        The exceptional mahogany case has a break arch hood with a top gallery, spire finials and there is Greek key decoration beneath. The dial is flanked by reeded columns with carved wood caps and there are large bevelled glass side windows. The trunk door has full length bevelled glass front and side windows. The front one being flanked by moulded panels with carved bases. There is a front and side panelled base with a bottom plinth and pad feet.Note: The flame mahogany veneers are of the highest quality.
        The massive 8-day movement has Harrison`s maintaining power. 5 huge double screwed pillars, dead beat escapement, six spoke wheelwork, 5 jewels, four end stops, jewelled pallets, top beat adjustment and a mercury pendulum with calibrated adjustment. The 12" silvered brass dial has regulator layout and a presentation inscription on the sight ring.
There are several Clerke clockmakers listed but the most probable is Frederick William Clerke working from 1863-1881. He would have been the retailer of this clock C1870. John Morrison whose trade mark appears on the front plate of the movement would have been commissioned to make the movement. A fine maker working from 1851 – 81.        This clock was presented to the Revd W.R. Mowll on his retirement in 1892. He originated in Kent, worked as curate at all souls church London, and then became vicar of Brixton. The clock has passed down through the family until recently.
 
Daniel Quare, London C1695.
A fine walnut longcase clock by Daniel Quare, London C1695.
         The flat topped hood has a fret, side windows and front and rear brass capped columns. A long trunk door has ½ round beaded edging, a herringbone border and a glass lenticle. The crossbanded base sits on bun feet; all the sides are laid into panels.         The 8-day movement has 5 finely turned pillars, anchor escapement and strikes the hours on a bell via an outside countwheel. The 10 ¾ " dial has winged cherub corner spandrels, silvered chapter and second’s rings, date aperture and a full signature below 6. It retains its original hands which must be among the finest he ever made.
Daniel Quare. (1648 – 1724) rose from obscure and apparently humble origins in Somerset to become one of the most illustrious clockmakers of England’s golden age of horology. On the 3/4/1671 he was admitted brother of the clockmakers company in 1680 he was working in exchange alley at the centre of London’s business community and probably worked there until the time of his death. He worked his way up in the clockmakers company to become master in 1708.
            Although Quare never became clock or watchmaker to the crown he did enjoy Royal patronage and many of his clocks, watches, and barometers can be seen in “Royal Clocks” by Cedric Jagger including a year going equation of time longcase in Hampton Court Palace, a similar clock with possibly Royal association is in the British Museum. At Huygens legacy exhibition at Het Loo Palace, Holland in the autumn of 2004 a grand sonnerie repeating table clock and a double dial equation of time walnut longcase of Quares making were displayed.
 
William Turner London
A magnificent George III mahogany longcase clock by William Turner London The hood has an arched top surmounted by 3 ball and spire finials. The arched glazed door is flanked by Corinthian capped reeded columns, which are brass inlaid on the bottom third. The arched trunk door, with moulded edges and cross banding is flanked by reeded pillars with Corinthian caps and brass inlay. The inlaid base is set on an apron. The eight day 5 pillar movement striking on a bell has a 12" arched brass dial with strike/silent in the arch, corner spandrels, raised chapter ring, seconds and date dials. The centre is matted and contains a silvered signature plate. William Turner was apprenticed in 1734 and was working in Church St. Spitafields, London until 1772.
 
Samuel Macham, London C1700
Samuel Macham, London C.1700
A fine and rare month going walnut and marquetry longcase clock.
 
The flat topped hood has a blind fret, side windows and a glazed door flanked by straight columns with brass capitals. A long trunk door has a ½ beaded surround and a brass edged oval lenticle. The matching base sits on a small plinth. The sides are set out in panels with chevron borders, and the whole case is banded with decorative borders. 
The movement strikes the hours on a bell, has a 12-inch square brass dial with raised chapter ring and cherub headed spandrels. The matted centre has a second’s ring, a date aperture with surrounding engraving and a strike/silent lever above 12. The substantial 5-pillar movement with outside locking plate runs for a month. 
 
A fine and rare clock.
 
 
 
Samuel Macham was working in London 1700 – 1710. Maker of clocks of some note. The general quality is above average. Two eight-day marquetry longcases by him are illustrated in Cescinsky and Webster English Domestic Clocks Figures 122 and 161.
 
Peter Walker, London C1690.
A very fine and rare mulberry longcase clock by Peter Walker, London C1690.
            The hood has a flat top with a fret beneath, side windows and tapering brass capped pillars. The trunk has a 42" long door with a glass lenticle and the base sits on bun feet. The whole case is veneered in the most wonderfully figured mulberry wood which is laid into panels.            The 8-day movement has 5 finely turned pillars, good wheelwork and strikes the hours via an inside countwheel. The 10 - 5/8 " dial has brass cherub spandrels, seconds dial, ringed winding holes and a date aperture with surrounding engraving. It has original hands and is signed on the chapter ring “Peter Walker Wild St End”.Peter Walker was apprenticed to Andrew Savory of London in 1681, a maker of repute. He died in Amsterdam in 1730.
SOLD
View DetailsView Details
SOLD
 
Thomas Johnson C1690.

A most exquisite walnut marquetry longcase clock by Thomas Johnson, Ratcliffe Cross, London C1690.
The flat topped hood has a fret, side windows, barley twist columns and flower and foliage marquetry around the door. The long trunk door has applied ½ round edging, a glass lenticle, and is divided up with 3 marquetry panels. There is a square panel of marquetry on the base, which sits on bun feet.Note: The attractive bird flower and foliage marquetry retains some of its original colour.
The excellent 8-day movement has 5 finely turned pillars, anchor escapement, good wheelwork and strikes the hours on a bell via an inside countwheel. The 10 3/4" dial has winged cherub head spandrels, fine hands, ringed winding holes, date aperture with engraved decoration and is signed on the chapter ring “Tho Johnson, London”.
Thomas Johnson was born in Stepney in 1649. He was apprenticed to Richard Drake in 1662 through the Blacksmiths company and worked at Ratcliffe Cross from 1680 – 1703. He took several apprentices from the Blacksmiths company including William Kipling in 1695, who later married his daughter Elizabeth. Thomas died around 1703 
 
John Wright, Dorking.
A very original and decorative late 18th century tavern clock by John Wright of Dorking.
 
       The 24" wooden dial with gilt and black surround, Roman and Arabic numerals and original gilded hands, the minute one being counter balanced. The long trunk has a full signature flanked by foliage decorated spandrels, a most decorative door with a central painted rural scene and a floral border. Floral and foliage decoration continues on the base and sides, and there are two leather hinged side doors for movement access.
       The 4 pillar 8-day movement has tapered plates, a five wheel train and original weight and pendulum.
  
          John Wright of Dorking (Surrey) was recorded working from 1771-1828.
 

The print on this clocks door is:
                            “Old Darby & Joan” by John June.Published by N. Carpenter, 60 Spencer St, London around 1760. One of these prints is in the British Museum and has the following verse`s beneath.
Old Darby, with Joan by his Side,You`ve oft-times regarded with Wonder,        He is dropsical, she is sore ey`d,Yet they`re ever uneasy asunder:
           Together they totter about,Or sit in the Sun at the door:And at Night when old Darbys Pot`s out,His Joan will not smoak one Whif more.
No beauty nor Wit they pofsefs,Their several Failings to smother,Then what are the Charms can you guefs,Which makes them so fond of each other?
`Tis the pleasing Remembrance of Youth,The Endearments that Youth did bestow,The thoughts of past pleasure and truth,The best of all blefsings below.
Details of this clock and its door print can be seen in the tavern clock by Martin Gatto pg 74 and 199. 

 

 

 
 
Henricus Montlow, London
A fine walnut longcase clock by Henricus Montlow, London C1690             The flat topped hood has a sound fret, side windows and barley twist columns with turned capitals. The long trunk door has applied ½ round edging and a glass lenticel. The base sits on bun feet.   This case is veneered in finely figured walnut, with the sides, trunk door and base crossbanded and set into panels with chevron borders.            The excellent 8-day movement has 5 finely turned pillars, anchor escapement, good wheelwork and strikes the hours on a bell via an inside countwheel. It has a well set out 11” dial with winged cherub head spandrels, fine hands, ringed winding holes, date aperture with three crown engraved decoration, a double line border and the full Latinised signature below 6 “Henricus Montlow, Londini fecit”.             Henricus Montlow was born in 1664 and apprenticed to Richard Browne in 1678 and was a member of the clockmakers company from 1685 – 1723 when his will was proven. He does not seem to have been active from around 1705. His work place was St Leonards Foster Lane Parish. A very fine walnut timepiece by him was sold at Bonhams, London 9/12/03 for £35K
 
John Shaw, Holbourn, London C.1700
A very fine walnut marquetry longcase clock by John Shaw, Holbourn, London C.1700. The hood has a caddy top, giltwood finials, front fret, side windows and attached side pillars with brass capitals. The 42" long trunk door has an inset brass bound lenticle and is exquisitely inlaid with bird, flower and foliage marquetry and a similarly decorated base sits on a plinth. The sides are set into panels with crossbanding and boxwood lines. Note: The marquetry has survived intact and retains some of its original colour. The eight day movement has 5 finely turned pillars which are latched as are the 4 dial feet, good wheelwork and strikes the hours on a bell via an inside countwheel. The very attractive 12" dial has an engraved border, ringed winding holes, original hands and a date aperture surrounded by decorative engraving. The chapter ring is fully signed and is distinguished by its most unusual 1/2 hour markers. John Shaw was apprenticed to Thomas Taylor of Holborn in 1672, was free of the Clockmakers Company in 1682 made assistant in 1705, warden in 1709 and was master in 1712. A very able maker with some fine examples still extant.
 
Joseph Martineau, London C.1750
An exceptional quality mahogany pagoda clock. The hood with shallow pagoda and fan inlay, topped with 3 original brass finials. A blind arcaded arched fret follows through the sides. Brass capped reeded columns, with ebony inlay and matching 1/2 columns to the rear, flank the arched glazed door. The full-length trunk door inlaid with panels. Blind fretwork above and to the trunk corners. The base has an elaborate double front and a shaped panel set on original feet. The eight day, 5 pillar movement striking the hours on a bell has a 12in arched brass dial, with applied chapter ring, corner spandrels, seconds dial, date aperture, strike-silent dial in the arch, and signature band signed Martineau, London.
 
Boothsbank Farm, Leigh Road, Worsley, Manchester M28 1LL. England